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12/23/2010

Beginning of the new era

JEN would like to express our sincere appreciation to those who support our program in Niigata, Japan.

December 23, 2010 in Niigata |

12/16/2010

The End and Start of the Project

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Thanks to the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Japan and supporters, the project for agricultural well installment and reinforcement of community organization in Batticaloa was completed on November 30. We appreciate it very much. In late November, we had a ceremony to celebrate the completion of the well inviting the district head and residents in the project sites, Chenkalady and Kiran.

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The ceremony was held in a tent under the heavy rain. The head of Kiran handed the handover notes to the well management committee of the district.

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The well is named “butterfly”, the team name of the committee members. Everyone is glad that the well was installed. The names of the members are also written on the board.

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In Chenkalady, although it was sunny for the first time in a long time, the ceremony was held in a tent.

We had a briefing session at a prefectural office on December 3. The governor, two heads of the districts and the member of District Planning Depertment joined the session. The project officer from JEN presented how the project went on. The governor highly appreciated our project of well installment in the areas that have many rocks.

Our next project will be to install wells and community organization reinforcement in 29 areas. Also we have a plan to construct small-size drain. We already hold a signing ceremony at an embassy on December 1st and the project will continue until November next year.

The next year is coming around the corner. JEN Batticaloa office is working hard as usual. We appreciate your continued support.

December 16, 2010 in Sri Lanka |

The Fight of Health Promoter

In Leogane where JEN perform some acitities, both people and livestock wash their bodies at rivers. People also use the water of river for washing their clothes and drinking. Most of them are thinking that water which is spring out again after empting the water in the hole near by the river is clean and safe because it is clear.

Cholera has spread in Leogane which has gotten big damage due to earthquake, and most of the people in there suffer from double damage. JEN can perform health educational activities at the region where an outbreak of cholera has happened like Leogane or Grand Goave because of supporter of JEN and corporation of Japan platform.

So far, 459 people of health promoter took training from JEN. They join this activity as unpaid volunteers so they have strong will that they want to change an unhygienic habit of more than 50 thousand local people. JEN’s staff saw health promoter’s steady effort with their own eyes when they visit houses of local people.

At first, some people doubt promoter but most of the messages about hygiene were accepted now. Local people misunderstand that promoter perform this activity to get economic reward, not to follow their strong will. In the country where people can not get job easily, the idea of “volunteer” is not easy to understand but promoter explain carefully and find the people who can work together with JEN without payment.

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Today, importance of hygienic countermeasure is widely understood because of practical damage of growing cholera. As involving this, local people started to evaluate health promoters. Most of the people visit health promoter of JEN to learn the way of prevention and information about cholera. They are considered as philosopher of that region.

In the meeting which JEN’s staff and health promoter perform, they always tell the people some important message about hygiene. Besides, the messages which was sent over and over in each region by health promoter were sent again as different form like poem, play, and pamphlet.

December 16, 2010 in Haiti |

Working with the Community … It is Tough

I was afraid of water and I could not swim at all. However, I became able to cross River Nile by canoe when I went to an island near Juba to conduct a survey for a project needs.

Firstly, I got on the canoe, which was only one mean of transportation for the island, by using all my courage to check living environment of people in that island.  I saw that children are swimming in the river and my fear was gradually increasing. After 10 minutes, I finally calmed down and enjoyed the guide by the boatman.

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Apparently, there is no “toilet” in Gondokoro Island at all! In spite of the fact that it was only 2 km away from Juba which was a capital city of Southern Sudan, this big island had been isolated because there was no bridge to that island and it was not able to take supply to that island.

I was told that the island was used as a hub for slave and ivory trade for Arabian invaders. Children in the island told me about a rich British couple who move into that place in 1940s. The children enjoyed having local mangos while they were talking.  That was true that that island was perfect to live.

Most people who settled in the island were engaged to agriculture or grazing. The food harvested in that island was counted on food supply of big city Juba. The livestock they had was used as marriage gift from gloom’s family to bride’s family.

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Although I fought to fear of water and arrived to the island in the end, we were not allowed to have a discussion with community members and take pictures since it was in the middle of election campaign for local referendum.

That is all for the news flash this time.

December 16, 2010 in South Sudan |

Working with the Community

I was afraid of water and I could not swim at all. However, I became able to cross River Nile by canoe when I went to an island near Juba to conduct a survey for a project needs.

 101216sudan_2 Firstly, I got on the canoe, which was only one mean of transportation for the island, by using all my courage to check living environment of people in that island.  I saw that children are swimming in the river and my fear was gradually increasing. After 10 minutes, I finally calmed down and enjoyed the guide by the boatman.

Apparently, there is no proper “toilet” in Gondokoro Island at all! In spite of the fact that it was only 2 km away from Juba which was a capital city of Southern Sudan, this big island had been isolated because there was no bridge to that island and it was not able to take supply to that island.

I was told that the island was used as a hub for slave and ivory trade for Arabian invaders. Children in the island told me about a rich British couple who move into that place in 1940s. The children enjoyed having local mangoes while they were talking.  That was true that that island was perfect to live.

Most people who settled in the island were engaged to agriculture or grazing. The food harvested in that island was counted on food supply of big city Juba. The livestock they had was used as marriage gift from gloom’s family to bride’s family.

Although I fought to fear of water and arrived to the island in the end, we were not allowed to have a discussion with community members and take pictures since it was in the middle of election campaign for local referendum.101216sudan_2_2

That is all for the news flash this time.

December 16, 2010 in South Sudan |

12/09/2010

The New Project Has Been Started!

Thanks to the cooperation of all of the supporters, UN-OCHA and the Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs, school reconstruction and hygiene promotion project had been completed in the end of October and November respectively. We would like to say thank you again.

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The new project has been started from December 1st. On this project, two prefectures are newly added as our action field. They are Diyala prefecture (bounded on the northeast of the capital Baghdad) and Kirkuk prefecture (located on the north side from Baghdad). Now our project is taken place in five prefectures; Baghdad, Babil, Anbar and the above-mentioned two prefectures.

These newly added two prefectures are not under good international support due to the security problem. It is said that many school buildings were destructed by fierce battle during the year 2006 ~ 2007 in Diyala. In other words, it is said as the hardest prefecture for the citizens to enjoy the basic social services.

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In Kirkuk prefecture where the refugees, returners and people in several ethnic groups as Arab, Kurd and Turkmen live together, the international support is still not enough for their needs. In 2007 as the terrible epidemic year of cholera in Iraq, the patients in this prefecture accounted 60% of the whole. We are apprehensive that the morbidity rate will get higher in case of re-epidemic as it is one of the most densely populated prefecture in Iraq.

Disease transmitted by water such as cholera can be adequately prevented by good hygienic condition. JEN is going to take actions for hygienic enlightening projects started with the reconstruction of broken water and other hygienic equipment.

December 9, 2010 in Iraq |

12/02/2010

JEN Get New Family!

New family comes at Pòtoprens office to join JEN. A female dog, whose breed of dog is Rottweiler, was born in Haiti eleven months ago. When large scale earthquake attack to Haiti, only first mounth has passed after her birth. Her breeder’s house was destroyed because of earthquake but she and her mother were survived and grew up in a tent.

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Actually, it is very difficult to find a watchdog in Haiti. At first, there are only few spot where dogs which is suitable to train as a watchdog are sold. Besides, even that spot has collapsed by earthquake, and many dogs were died. Because of these situations, a watchdog can not find in Haiti easily.  Of course, as one of the choice, we can import watchdogs from neighbor countries. However, we choose the dog in Haiti which survive from earthquake because we thought this dog can be a member of JEN through the activities with us against goal as “revive”.

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Fortunately, we met this female dog through the driver of JEN. We began to live together from November 22th. A general election would be on 28th and reinforcement of security was demanded for fear of disturbing peace after the election.

When I joined the cultural lecture of Haiti, the reason why people in Haiti do not like dogs deeply related to history of colony age. Haiti was one of the most abundant colonies so the way to control of Haiti was cruelly and dirty. At that age, dog was used not only for threaten the slaves. When slaves run away, they were run down to sea shore, and they needed to choose “drown in the sea” or “eaten by a fierce dog.” Besides, the people who are colonialism use dog as a show. People in Haiti were taking over this memories of suppression and fear, and they can not eliminate that memories after two hundred years from independence.

Rolca, A new family of JEN, is just child dog but it has already big. When she came to our place, John peter, security staff of JEN, looked that he felt fear to the dog. He lives in JEN’s office. We asked him to take care of Rolca but his face looks freeze and smile is disappeared from his face. However, several days later, he is smiling at Rolca, and treats her well. This is exactly prove fear comes from ignorance. He start to take care of Rolca, and he learn that she do not attack him without any reason, and finally they can understand each other.

December 2, 2010 in Haiti |

12/01/2010

Shantakumar and His Small Farm

Shantakumar, his wife and their two children live in the village of Matiyamadu in the Parantan region. At the age of 32, he operates a modest plantation.

He returned here eight months ago from a refugee camp. The war cost Shantakumar both of his legs and most of his assets.

Today, he lives with the aid of prosthetic legs. The war also took his mother and brother. Living with him are his widowed sister and her seven children. Although those children can now return to school in the village they were born, one has suffered hearing damage during the war.
 
Through support from JEN, Shantakumar received barbed wire, crucial for protecting his crops from animals like free-range cattle and goats. With it in place, he sowed bean seeds bought from the agricultural center.

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This month, JEN plans to distribute pesticide sprayers. Shantakmar’s wife currently assists with the farm work, but in the future she’ll be able to leave it to help care for her relatives.
 
Shantakmar is deeply grateful to all of you for making it possible to earn a living with his farm.

December 1, 2010 in Sri Lanka |