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09/30/2010

Breakfast in Jordan

Some of you who read the article for sweet tooth Jordan, updated in the beginning of July, might be interested in daily meals in Jordan. Today I’m going to introduce about Jordanian breakfast.

This picture shows a popular style of breakfast. Clockwise from the top,
Khobs=pita bread:

It’s sometime pronounced like ‘Hobs’ in other countries, but it seems ‘Khobs’ is more similar to Arabian pronunciation.

100923_typical_breakfast
Farafel:Fried bean paste with spice

Foul:Boiled and mashed broad bean

Hommos:Garbanzo bean paste, also called as ‘Hummus’

Arabian Salad:Salad

You can buy ‘khobs’ with a coin everywhere. It’s sold by the kilogram (roughly 12 ~ 13 pieces), not by loose as on picture. 1kg of Khobs costs only about USD 0.35. (Ex rate as of 19th February 2011)

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Various makers have their original canned hommos. It will taste soft as in restaurants if you mix it with olive oil, mustard, ketchup and water.

100923_canned_hommos

September 30, 2010 in Iraq |

Breakfast in Jordan

Some of you who read the article about " sweet tooth Jordan ",  might be interested in daily meals in Jordan. Today let me introduce Jordanian breakfast.


The picture shows a popular style of breakfast. Clockwise from the top,
100923_typical_breakfast

*Khobs=pita bread:     It’s sometime pronounced like ‘Hobs’ in other countries, but it seems ‘Khobs’ is more similar to Arabian pronunciation.
*Farafel:    Fried bean paste with spice
*Foul:    Boiled and mashed broad bean
*Hommos:    Garbanzo bean paste, also called as ‘Hummus’
*Arabian Salad:    Salad

You can buy ‘khobs’ with a coin everywhere. It’s sold by the kg (roughly 12 -13 pieces), not by loose as on picture. 1kg of Khobs costs only about USD 0.35*.

   

Various makers have their original canned Hommos. It will taste soft as in restaurants if you mix it with olive oil, mustard, ketchup and water.

   

(*Exchange rate: as of 19th February 2011)

September 30, 2010 in Iraq |

09/24/2010

Procurement of distribution materials

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We visited a local contractor in Islamabad that will be supplying us with shelter kits (construction materials and building tools), to do some product sample checks.

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This company mainly sells relief items. They had already received orders from UN organizations, USAID and other NGOs, as stocks of the materials were stacked up, and the staff were very busy packing them.

100924_p9200014 According to the CEO of the company, the prices have gone up by about 30~40% after the flood. The tents made domestically could not meet the demand that the company had to import some from Dubai.

September 24, 2010 in Pakistan |

09/23/2010

Staff Introduction: Marie Dibangue

Marie_id_pic   My name is Marie Dibangue, born in the city of Douala, which is an economic capital in Cameroon. I am the second child in the family of five children.

  I left Cameroon seven years ago for Beirut, Lebanon to continue my studies in political science at Saint Joseph University, where I obtained my Master’s degree in political science. I have also completed a professional training in mediation.

  Living in Lebanon provided me with an opportunity to supplement my theoretical studies with a one-of-kind field experience. Due to its ethnic complexity, ideological divisions, and the exterior interferences that have constantly challenged its independence, Lebanon is again undergoing multiple conflicts.

  In 2004, I joined an NGO where I conducted different actions to initiate peace dialogue and reconciliation among people in Lebanon. I participated in all kinds of activities there, of which the inauguration of free summer camps for children and reconstruction projects were particularly enjoyable.

  During the war in Lebanon in summer 2006, in response to the humanitarian emergency, I volunteered to host refugees from Southern Lebanon in shelters. Having been trained in methods of coaching and teaching youth through UNFPA-Lebanon, I taught courses in English and educated students on human rights in Marwahim in South Lebanon, at a local school that had been rebuilt after the 33-day war. I also participated in peace actions, especially in the countryside "Our Unity is Our Salvation" implemented by 49 NGOs during the year 2007, to restore hope in the inter-Lebanese dialogue.

  I have strong conviction in humanitarian action. I believe working with JEN is the perfect opportunity to fulfill my ambitions.

  In Haiti, I work as a program officer for JEN’s hygiene promotion project, which has been an extremely fascinating experience. I believed that our action can change people’s habits regarding hygiene.








September 23, 2010 in HaitiStaff |

09/22/2010

Challwngin in Haiti, Part 2: Many rivers to cross.

30 minutes later, JEN's vehicle was running national highway in the rain. Vehicle was beyond five rivers without trouble!

We got a contact from volunteer who lives around our project site that we would not be able to go back to the site today because the road is closed due to increasing water of rivers.This is why, we would go to Grand Goave, next town of the site, to buy something necessary for our project.

However, we caught a traffic jam right away and that makes our staff members annoyed. Grand Goave is only five kilometer away from the point beyond the rivers, but our car can not move on. We got stuck in the muddy water but other cars did not make the line behind us and nobody helped us. After all, we spent three hours to move on only five hundred meters!

Since the bridge between Grand Goave and Foche felling down due to earthquake on January 12th, there is no way to get the town except crossing this river. Normally, we call this place 'a bank', but this place will remain 'river' several months because of rain.

Today is too hard to say 'normal', and we hope there will never continue such a day.
After several months, the season of a hurricane will be coming, and it is possible that large scale of hurricane directly hit to Haiti so we must be cautious about that.
Millions of people in Haiti can be homeless again.

September 22, 2010 in Haiti |

The power of the flood

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These kinds of images are common in village Pirno, UC Utmanzai, showing the aftermath of the flood.
The most destructive flood in the last 80 years that brought massive devastation to all aspects of life.

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A group photo with local committee for flood affected people. Majority of the people of Utmanzai are educated, very cooperative .they provided all the necessary information and guided us throughout our visit.
 
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This picture was taken during our first visit of UC Utmanzai, village Gharai Charsadda on 21st September.
The destruction level can be seen in this photo as the flood water rushed inside the houses, touching the roof tops. We hardly observed any house unaffected in the whole village.  People have started to gather debris of their damaged or collapsed houses for possible rehabilitation.

September 22, 2010 in Pakistan |

09/16/2010

Staff Introduction: Romain Briey

Cimg0356_low   I am a French citizen born 37 years ago close to the border between Belgium, Luxembourg, and Germany. It has now been quite a long time since I left the Northeast side of France.

  After a completely normal childhood and teenage years fully dedicated to cycling, I left home and the area where I grew up after high School to join the French Elite Permanent Training Center in Bordeaux, a big city in the Southwest of France renowned for its wine. There, as a young eighteen-year old country boy, I discovered at once independence from the familiar environment, life as a student, the all-year-round temperate weather, and the ambivalent relationship between cycling, professionalism, and doping...

  With all my dreams of becoming a successful, professional sportsman ruined, I returned the year after that to the Northeast side of France to study business at a decent-sized city called Nancy.

  Two years later, after graduation and as I was ready to move to England for extensive studies, I got called by the national service… A ten-month compulsory service in the French army was the rule for all young French men at the time. Not interested at all in the army and especially spending ten dreary months not doing anything interesting with very little money (around 100 USD/month), I took the risk of applying for an extensive period with the possibility of being stationed abroad in exchange!

  Having been fascinated by Africa since I was a child, I of course applied for a position in the black continent among all other choices.

  Dakar, Senegal!

  I don’t remember being happier than the day I saw these two words in the letter asking me to be in the closest Air Force base to my parents’ home on January 4th, 1996. As I had expected and dreamt many times before, I spent two years in pure heaven in West Africa. As lucky as I was to get a fascinating job as a private secretary of the Chief of the French army Head Quarters there, I was also allowed a chance to take regular four-month holidays. Traveling for about three weeks every three to four months during these two years, I got to discover and experience much more than I had ever thought was possible.
By the end of 1998, upon my return to the civilian life in France, I knew that one day I would work as humanitarian worker.

  Strangely enough, it was as a manager of a supermarket that I started my professional life… I spent three years in Paris followed by two years in Guadeloupe in the French West Indies, Caribbean, where I realized it was time to revisit my initial idea of joining the humanitarian world.  Once again, however, reality turned my plan around completely, and I ended up living in Copenhagen, Denmark for seven years before finally working for JEN in Haiti as a humanitarian worker.

  Program officer since March 6th 2010, I have to say I am actually glad that it took me a long time to join the NGO world.  I realize everyday how all the different experiences I have accumulated in my background are extremely useful.

 
Romain

September 16, 2010 in HaitiStaff |

Before the New Term Starts

It has passed for two weeks since the second term started in Japan. Here in Iraq, the students have two more weeks to enjoy their summer vacation. (Anyway it seems to last boiling hot days over 40℃ in Baghdad.)

Now JEN project is in the last-minute preparation stage for the Hygiene Promotion Project.
(For detail please refer to the article written on February 4th and July 22nd.)

100916hygiene_kit

Already purchased the cleaning equipment, hygiene kits such as soaps and tooth brushes, our last work is only to prepare the teaching material. It will be organized the content, ordered some illustrations, and will get the approval of the Ministry of Education in Iraq before printing. We have been discussed in detail like the best size of the text would be…, the quality of papers would be…it would be better to select strong and lustrous paper for covers… and so on. Completed texts will be arrived from printer in the end of summer vacation.

100916trash_bins This project is highly supported by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Japan, United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affair (UN-OCHA) and all of the supporters.

September 16, 2010 in Iraq |

What to do during Eid ul-Fiter in Afghanistan?

Eid ul-Fiter, shortened to Eid, is a Muslim holiday that marks the end of Ramadan. Muslims are commanded by the holy Quran to terminate their fast on the last day of Ramadan, the Islamic holy month of fasting. Eid means festivity in Arabic, while Fitr means to purify, so the holiday symbolizes purification after completing the fasting month. It is also the time to give donations to the poor people, visit the sick and to spend time with family and friends.

In Afghanistan, the Eid festival holds such social importance that, Afghans start preparing for it up to ten days prior to it. Preparations include cleaning up their homes, many will also go to their local bazaars to buy new clothes, buying sweets and snacks to serve the guests during the day’s festivities. On the first day of Eid, people will first offer their Eid prayers at 8:30 or 9:00 AM and after that everybody embraces each others to congratulates the Eid. After returning to homes, families gather in someone’s home, and greet one another with “Eidet MOBARAK”, or “Happy Eid to you and may your fasting and prayers be accepted by Allah”. Family elders give small allowances to children. It is also common to visit families and friends, although it may be sometimes difficult to do, since the duration of Eid is merely three days!

Thank you for reading, 
A.Fahim

September 16, 2010 in Afghanistan |

Ramadan, the fasting and its tradition in Afghanistan

Eid ul-Fitr (Eid festival) is the ninth month in the Islamic calendar which means the end of Ramadan.

The Muslims are preached by the Holy Qur'an, to end the holy month of Ramadan on the last day of fasting. Eid means "festival" and Fitoru means "lustration" in Arabic, which represents purification after ending fast.

The Eid festival in Afghanistan is not just a festival, but it means more than that. First, when they prepare for the celebration, the Muslims begin cleaning their house 10 days before the festival. The people buy sweets and new clothes to welcome their guest at home.

At home, it is a habit to give pocket money to the children and meet relatives and friends whom you hardly see.

Thus, at the festival “Eid al Fitoru” scheduled at the end of the month of Ramadan, people spend their time with their family and friends, and spend time to cherish the people in need.

The service to celebrate the festival begins from 8:30 or 9:00 AM on the first day. Everyone embraces each other celebrating the wonderful festival. After the festival, they return home and celebrate the festival with their family. Exchanging the phrase “Ei de Mubarak” , everyone celebrates their pray and fast so that it will be accepted by Allah. At each home it is a habit to give pocket money to the children, meet family members and friends difficult to see at their daily life.

This is how people spend their time during the festival “Eid al Fitoru”  at the end of the Ramadan month with people who you care the most.

September 16, 2010 in Afghanistan |

Ready to go

It is in September and has been for two weeks since the second term at school started in Japan. Here in Iraq, the students have two more weeks to enjoy their summer vacation. (Anyway it seems to last boiling hot days over 40℃ in Baghdad.)

Today, JEN's project is in the final preparation stage for the Hygiene Promotion Project.
(For further detail, please refer to the article on 4th February and 22nd July.)

100916_iraq_2_2  Purchase of the cleaning equipment is done such as hygiene kits such as soaps and tooth brushes. Our last work is to finalize the teaching material. The content, some illustrations to be inserted in
order, and will get the approval from the Ministry of Education in Iraq before sending over for printing process.

We have been discussing detail
precisely, like the best size of the text would be…, the quality of papers would be…it would be better to select strong and lustrous paper for covers… and so on. Completed texts will be arrived from the printer in the end of summer vacation.100916_iraq_2_3

September 16, 2010 in Iraq |

09/09/2010

Life is worth living

100908_02_rahman_guls_children_livi Rahman Gul from UC Gumbat lost his two daughters and had his house severely damaged by the flood. The irreparable loss caused him a mountain of sorrow that was unbearable for him, and he thought that that would be the end of him and his family. He now has to bear the loss of his two daughters, reconstruct the house, and find a means to earn his living.

JEN was by far the only and first organization that sympathized with his sorrows, convinced him that life is worth living, and provided him with the foundations to restart his life with enthusiasm through the provision of non-food items. Now he has moved on to continue earning his living at the local market by loading and unloading cargos from vehicles, thereby providing his remaining children with a beacon of life.

September 9, 2010 in Pakistan |

When resuming life was a dream

100908_01_children_on_wreckages_of_ Janas Khan and Shah Nawaz are brothers who live in UC Gumbat with five and four children, respectively. Both brothers earn their living through transporting daily necessities on a horse carriage from a market in Gumbat to their neighbouring villages.
One night, when the brothers were sleeping with their children, water suddenly rushed into their house at two in the morning. They all woke up only to discover that their house had been inundated. Their only option then was to evacuate the house to go to a safe area. It was extremely difficult for the brothers to take their nine children to a safe place while the house was being inundated by the rapidly rushing water. While they were struggling to escape, some of their children got injured, but fortunately, they successfully reached a safe area.

100908_01_a_child_in_front_of_his_d Early morning the next day, when they returned to their house, there was nothing but wreckage, and their house had been completely destroyed. The relentless water also washed away their horse, which was their only source of income. They therefore not only had their house completely demolished but also lost their only means of income. It was the most difficult time for the family. They lost all hope and could not imagine restoring their life again, being a big family.


100908_01_cart_is_there_while_hor_2 100908_01_family_is_living_in_ten_2 No one from the government or humanitarian organizations came to assist them; only their neighbours assisted them with food. It was JEN’s assessment team that visited their house to ask what their needs were. In two days, JEN provided them with a package of non-food items, which allowed them to live their life in dignity again. Now that they acquired the necessary items for living, they are able to plan for reconstructing their house and continue earning their living.  100908_01_child_is_washing_hands_wi   

September 9, 2010 in Pakistan |

Challenges in Haiti

It would not be so far from the truth to say that there are countless challenges in Haiti. For hundreds of years, Haiti has been suffering from a variety of problems, such as poverty, poor economy, unemployment, lack of education, inadequate water supply, poor sanitation, lack of health facilities, vulnerability to natural disasters, political instability, dire security situation, drug trafficking, insufficient agricultural resources, lack of livestock management, and many more that we may not have realized yet.

In spite of these challenges, it is interesting that Haiti is the first independent nation in the Caribbean, the only nation that gained independence through slave rebellion. Haiti is the second independent nation in all of America after the United States.

Now how do we assist Haiti in tackling these challenges? The only answer I can think of is to make people in Haiti self-reliant. 

People in Haiti will eventually have to stand on their own, instead of depending on others. Haiti will prosper if their people realize the importance of self-reliance. Haiti has fertile land that is useful for agriculture, rains, a variety of fruits, beautiful hills, and some of the finest beaches in the world.

JEN’s mandate is to assist disaster-affected people in becoming self-reliant, so we are trying to follow that mandate here in Haiti; by physically involving local people in our projects. JEN is rehabilitating 80 water works and providing hygiene promotion education to local communities, of which expected beneficiaries are around 50,000. Both projects are ongoing through the help of volunteers from local communities. These volunteers are working without any financial support from JEN. Admittedly, it is difficult to imagine working with volunteers from a country that has recently been affected by a massive earthquake, and many NGOs, in fact, have “Cash for Work” projects. JEN’s staff, however, has successfully made people realize to stand on their own and work for themselves without any external incentive but their future.

We hope that what we are doing here is best for Haiti.

In the dismal slums, the traumatized Haitians are living in “torn, sweltering, and soaked tents suitable at best for weekend camping,” surrounded by rubble and stench of rotting garbage, their patience taxed to the limit, and their lives shattered for lack of basic services, including housing, sanitation, and enough food and clean water.

Torrential afternoon rains leave “lake-sized puddles in which mosquitoes breed and spread malaria. Deep, raspy coughs can be heard everywhere. Scabies and other infections transform children’s soft skin into irritating red bumpy rashes. Bellies are swelling and the hair turning orange from malnutrition. Vomiting and diarrhea are as common as flies.”

September 9, 2010 in Haiti |

Once Nervous, Now Happy. A tale of Teacher

We conducted the monitoring visit of hygiene education at Kajo Keji county. JEN uses an interactual method called PHAST for hygiene education. JEN's support is carefully organized to let the participants, children at the primary schools, notice the problems related to hygiene, find the solutions and take actions for these.

In addition, JEN has been providing some trainings which enable the teachers to provide hygiene education to new students after JEN completes the project at that school. 25 teachers from 22 primary schools took part in the training held at Kajo Keji county.

This was the first time for the teachers to participate in this kind of training so that they seemed slightly nervous. However, they started to be familiar each other through the group works and exchanged ideas in a enthusiastic way. The photos show the work for the technique used for telling the actions related to hygiene issues happened in the communities near the schools by picture. A plenty of unique pictures were showed at the time. After the classroom lecture for 3 days, they visited the community to have some practical training.  In the end, the teachers returned to their schools with confidence after they completed the training.

We can imagine how the teachers provide hygiene education to children next year after JEN complete the project.

Michi Yamanakajima, Head of Office at Juba

September 9, 2010 in South Sudan |

09/02/2010

Dates and Palm Trees

Now we are in September basis Islamic calendar, a Ramadan term of this year.
(As for Ramadan, please refer to the articles updated on September 2008 or October 2007.) Muslims fasts during daytime, from sunrise to sunset in a day.

100831

This is a kind of confectionery called Klaicha, plenty made before Ramadan, and to be eaten well during Ramadan. This is made of the paste rolled with dates (fruit of date palm, shown in black part on picture), and later cut into pieces. Before the recipe was simplified, it had been made at a price. It had been rounded piece by piece not to show stuffed dates, coated its surface with yolk and then baked. It was a kind of work taken whole day. In Jordan and Palestine, sesame is occasionally stuffed instead of dates as it’s also familiar to them.
100831_2   

100831_3                           


In Iraq, cutting down a palm tree is said to let a life disappear. During 2003 invasion of Iraq, a large number of palm trees were cut down to clear all the things shut out visibility. Some of Iraqi people think this is why they had heavy mortality.

September 2, 2010 in Iraq |

Dates and Palm Trees

Now we are in September based on Islamic calendar, fasting season of the year.
(More information about fasting season or "Ramadan", please refer to the articles updated on September 2008 or October 2007.)

100902_iraq_3 This is a kind of confectionery called "Klaicha", plenty made before Ramadan, and to be eaten well during Ramadan. This is made of the paste rolled with dates (fruit of date palm, shown in black part on picture), and later cut into pieces. Before the recipe was simplified, it had been made at a price. It had been rounded piece by piece not to show stuffed dates, coated its surface with yolk and then baked. It was a kind of work taken whole day. In Jordan and Palestine, sesame is occasionally stuffed instead of dates as it’s also familiar to them.
             100902_iraq_3_2      100902_iraq_3_3            
In Iraq, cutting down a palm tree is said to let a life disappear. During 2003 invasion in Iraq, a large number of palm trees were cut down in order to visualize things are cleared. Some of Iraqi people think this is why they had heavy mortality.

September 2, 2010 in Iraq |